Why Muslims should care about war studies

Esra N. Kandur The post-9/11 era has witnessed an entire generation of Muslims reach adulthood with a heightened sense of political awareness. With increased public scrutiny of Muslims around the world and greater coverage of events in Muslim countries, the news is often a subject of constant discussion at home. Whether rooted in an ummatic consciousness or feelings of conflicted identity, young Muslims in several … Continue reading Why Muslims should care about war studies

Gender series: “I just don’t think Muslim women should be working”

“I just don’t think Muslim women should be working … I mean, as a Muslim woman, your duty is to look after your husband and children; it’s the man’s duty to provide, and the woman’s duty to take care of the household.” “This is a modern day issue. Muslim women of the past knew their roles and responsibilities; they didn’t neglect their husbands and children … Continue reading Gender series: “I just don’t think Muslim women should be working”

Reflections on Rabi’ al-Awwal

In this blessed month of Rabi’ al-Awwal, as our hearts turn towards the remembrance of Prophet Muhammad ﷺ, five of the Qarawiyyin Project’s contributors put forward their reflections on the Seerah and the status of Rasulallah ﷺ. Knowing the beloved Aisha Hasan The station of Muhammad ﷺ is guaranteed by his name: “the praised one”. In the history of humanity, no man has been praised … Continue reading Reflections on Rabi’ al-Awwal

Bogeymen and where to find them: Reading Bennabi

Sarah B. Who can we blame for the ummah’s problems? Muslim governments? Non-Muslim governments? Scholars? Activists?  Or can we blame events, historical and contemporary — colonisation or the War on Terror? Or do we blame ourselves? Are our material conditions a reflection of our spiritual state? The list of culprits is endless, but such attributions of blame rarely serve as a mirror to assess our … Continue reading Bogeymen and where to find them: Reading Bennabi

The demoralised Muslim mind

Nayla Majestya  During my graduate studies some years ago, I remember having countless conversations with my peers concerning our struggle to feel happy. It appeared rather ridiculous; we were a group of young, healthy students, with a decent level of intellect, and in a stable enough financial situation to be able to choose graduate school over earning our keep. Yet in a bid to feel … Continue reading The demoralised Muslim mind