University Reading List

As many of our readers prepare to start the new academic year, The Qarawiyyin Project presents a special reading list dedicated to combatting some of the issues often faced at university. Ranging from personal development and activism, to imbibing an Islamic alternative to a liberal worldview, these books are aimed at equipping young Muslims with the confidence to navigate  campus life.  Purification of the Heart … Continue reading University Reading List

Ramadan: Attaining Taqwa in a Secular Era

Aisha Hasan يَا أَيُّهَا الَّذِينَ آمَنُواْ كُتِبَ عَلَيْكُمُ الصِّيَامُ كَمَا كُتِبَ عَلَى الَّذِينَ مِن قَبْلِكُمْ لَعَلَّكُمْ تَتَّقُونَ O you who believe, fasting has been decreed upon you, as it was decreed upon those before, so you that you may attain taqwa. As we enter Ramadan, this verse is one that we will hear regularly as a motivation for us to use this blessed month to … Continue reading Ramadan: Attaining Taqwa in a Secular Era

‘We really need more female scholars’ – a response

Aisha Hasan “We really need more female scholars” A statement heard time and time again in Muslim communities in the West. Whether it is an organisation searching for a female speaker for an event or a general discussion lamenting the lack of knowledge amongst Muslims, the importance of female scholarship is regularly mentioned as a crucial factor in countering the problems of the Ummah around … Continue reading ‘We really need more female scholars’ – a response

Khadijah (ra): A standard working mother?

Today, for many women struggling against glass ceilings and unequal pay, the fact that the wife of the Prophet ﷺ, Khadijah (ra), was a wealthy entrepreneur in a time where most business owners were men is a source of pride. Often cited as a true representation of women’s empowerment under Islam, our knowledge of how Khadijah (ra) proposed marriage to the Prophet ﷺ when she … Continue reading Khadijah (ra): A standard working mother?

People think hijab sexualises young girls because of the Muslim community

Aisha Hasan Last week UK education watchdog Ofsted announced that it would be questioning Muslim girls in primary schools who wear the hijab, prompting outrage amongst the Muslim community. The reason for this unwarranted, invasive, intrusive questioning: the decision to wear hijab may have been forced on young girls, causing them to be sexualised at an early age. In recent days, the Muslim community in … Continue reading People think hijab sexualises young girls because of the Muslim community