Emily and Empire

Musabika Nabiha Days after Netflix’s latest production Emily in Paris premiered to millions of viewers around the world, a critic described it as a “love letter to American exceptionalism.”[1] In the days that followed, tweeters and digital publications alike echoed the sentiment: the show disrespects French culture, its portrayals of French people are wrong and clichéd, and worst of all, its protagonist displays a supreme American … Continue reading Emily and Empire

The Use and Misuse of Critical Thinking

Nayla Majestya Being a Muslim in the liberal arts, I have lost count of the number of times I have been told to be ‘critical’. There is an underlying assumption that as I am visibly Muslim, I must be simple-minded and in dire need of ‘critical thinking’ to be liberated from my false beliefs. However, over the years I have realised that this advice is … Continue reading The Use and Misuse of Critical Thinking

Why Muslims should care about war studies

Esra N. Kandur The post-9/11 era has witnessed an entire generation of Muslims reach adulthood with a heightened sense of political awareness. With increased public scrutiny of Muslims around the world and greater coverage of events in Muslim countries, the news is often a subject of constant discussion at home. Whether rooted in an ummatic consciousness or feelings of conflicted identity, young Muslims in several … Continue reading Why Muslims should care about war studies

Bogeymen and where to find them: Reading Bennabi

Sarah B. Who can we blame for the ummah’s problems? Muslim governments? Non-Muslim governments? Scholars? Activists?  Or can we blame events, historical and contemporary — colonisation or the War on Terror? Or do we blame ourselves? Are our material conditions a reflection of our spiritual state? The list of culprits is endless, but such attributions of blame rarely serve as a mirror to assess our … Continue reading Bogeymen and where to find them: Reading Bennabi

“Why can’t Muslims take a joke?”

Aaminah Y. The world of entertainment has played its part in recent attempts to tackle institutional racism. As artists stepped down from voicing non-white characters and streaming sites removed scenes featuring racially insensitive content, a much needed line was redrawn in determining what is acceptable humour.  Yet, one area still subject to ridicule in the mainstream is religion. From the blasphemous Danish cartoons of the … Continue reading “Why can’t Muslims take a joke?”